Riot From Wrong Screening

Exactly one year to the day filming commenced, an exclusive preview screening of Riot From Wrong will be taking place at The BFI SouthBank on Thursday August the 9th at 4pm. This will be followed by a Q&A with members of the team. A remarkable feature length youth-led documentary; filmed across the breadth of the United Kingdom in the aftermath of the riots of 2011. Riot From Wrong was born out of a severe need to look deeper than the actions of those that rioted and in doing so it goes right to the heart of the issues affecting our society. The aim of this epic journey is to investigate sustainable solutions for measurable change. “This film breaks the mould of conventional perceptions peddled by the mainstream media. It opens doors that have remained firmly closed on a generation which feels disenfranchised and disempowered. Made by young people at street level who have access and credibility, not by pontificating pundits. It is set to become an historic and definitive document. A resource which should be viewed by all those who care about the restoration of an inclusive and effective democracy” Michael Mansfield, QC “One thing I learned from Riot From Wrong is that 14 young people can get closer to the truth than 90% of working journalists” Dan Hancox, Author of Kettled Youth, Journalist at The Guardian Touching dialogue from the family of Mark Duggan and victims of the unrest punctuate contributions from many people, including those overlooked by mainstream media. Engaging the audience throughout whilst delivering a plethora of viewpoints, from those who rioted and looted to the...

STOP PRESS: Research & Leadership Awards Post the Riots Announced

On the 9th August, 18:00 central London, IARS in partnership with the 99% Campaign and with support from the Big Lottery Fund, are holding the first Awards Ceremony of the national Research and Leadership Annual Awards IARS a leading, international think-tank with a charitable mission to give everyone a chance to forge a safer, fairer and more inclusive society. The 99% Campaign is a youth-led initiative that aims to dispel negative stereotypes of young people, and promote their involvement in decision-making processes and civic life. The awards were developed on the back of the 2011 summer riots and aim to recognise the young people, community members and public services staff who help to deliver IARS mission to give everyone a chance to forger a fairer society. John Palmer, Chair of IARS’ Board of Trustees said, “These awards recognise the importance of the work which we do with community groups and the development of grass-roots programmes to restore harm. I look forward to seeing as many people as possible at the ceremony”. Dr. Theo Gavrielides, Founder and Director of IARS said, “We are proud of our young people and indeed all of those who have worked hard over the last year to restore their communities. Thank you to all the sponsors for supporting our Awards”. While shortlisting has already begun, nominations are still welcome until Friday 27th July The award categories are: The Peacemaker of the Year Award (sponsored by Khulisa UK); The 99% Campaign Young Journalist Award (sponsored by METRO); The Community Leader Award (sponsored by NEPOMAK UK and LGR 103.3 FM); The IARS Researcher Award (sponsored by SARF...

Bursary botch-up

Last year saw the coalition government embark on a series of cuts directly affecting young people, the most controversial perhaps, being the scrapping of EMA. One year on we see that the promise by the educational secretary Michael Gove of a “more targeted” scheme broken, as many students from underprivileged backgrounds are being left without support or information. Unfortunately, current practice within Harrow’s collegiate of sixth forms is allowing many students from low income backgrounds to slip through the safety net. Thus, their ability to finance higher education is becoming increasingly difficult. The government’s devolution of powers from central organisations to schools has led to an inefficient criteria and a practice which is unsustainable. At present, the point which determines whether you receive the financial aid, is based upon whether or not you receive ‘Free School Meals’. However, from my own investigations and personal experiences of the process, I have found that the allocation of ‘Free School Meals’ itself excludes those who receive Working Tax Credits, regardless of whether your annual income is still under £16,190. Therefore, students from low income backgrounds – whose parents work – are being severely penalized. Furthermore, the lack of any appeals system leads to students being left in an impossible situation where they find themselves without help, advice or information. Instances have been found where students who have lodged formal appeals waiting months to receive any solid information. Although this article only concerns the practice of the fund within Harrow’s schools, it is clear that devolving power to schools is a bad idea, thus it is not hard to imagine that this is...

No seen, not heard

For a long time now, councils across the country have struggled with the growing problem of teenagers. Not all teenagers though, just the ones hanging around in public places late at night, for no particular reason. Well, in North Wales, the police have found a controversial new way to deal with the trouble makers, introducing a 9PM curfew for all under-16s. Whilst I recognise that having groups of teenagers loitering around at night is a genuine problem, I feel I can vouch for young people when I say that they are not doing it out of choice. Too young for most late-night social activities, such as going to the pub, and too old to simply stay at home watching TV with their Mums, under-16s are left in the awkward in-between stage where they have got nothing to do in the evening, so they end up on the streets, hanging around with their mates and just joking about. Of course, this isn’t ideal for anyone. But whether the curfew is an effective method or not is debatable. In some ways, it is – it keeps kids off the streets, I suppose. But it certainly doesn’t fix the underlying problem: the fact that there are very few things for teenagers to do in the evenings. The 9PM curfew just provides a cheap, short-term solution, which doesn’t really solve the problem. And as soon as the curfew ends, in six months, the teenagers are most definitely just going to head straight back to the streets- because they still won’t have anything else to do in the evenings! And not only is it...

Remembering the riots

Last summer, in response to the riots that took place in London and across the UK, 99% young journalists wrote numerous opinion pieces about the events from a youth perspective. These articles written by young people helped to counter-balance some extremist views that were expressed in the media and political debates.With the anniversary of the riots approaching, the 99% Campaign blog takes a look back at some of these articles. We have also partnered with IARS and various other organisations such as METRO UK, Khulisa, NEPOMAK and Bucks New University to establish a new awards innitiative that will recognise on annual basis young people and and individuals who helped their communities following the riots. The Awards page can be accessed via this link We are now looking for new articles that express the views and feelings of young people on the riots one year on. Please submit these at 99percentcampaign@iars.org.uk The articles will be considered for the 99% Campaign Young Journalist Award sponsored by METRO. See here for prizes. ————————————————————————————- “There is a desperate need for societal change” Isabel Chapman, 22, from Brixton Being a relatively new resident of Lambeth I was extremely excited to be attending the Brixton Splash festival on Sunday. As we enjoyed an afternoon spent dancing on Coldharbour Lane there was an untainted, unapologetic sense of celebration.  Evening drew closer and the only sense of an alteration in mood was the sombre realisation that Monday morning was once again looming; our weekend was over and it was time for bed. I was aware, though, there would probably still be some noise and partying into the early hours; unsurprisingly Brixton is rarely...