A Year In Review

A Year In Review

As the end of 2012 approaches, the first year of the 99 Percent Campaign Blog has almost arrived. Our current efforts to challenge the negative stereotypes of young people would not have been possible without the help of our amazing volunteer journalists who have each contributed to the blog. So before the year ends, we will take a look back at some of the many great articles that not only represented the experiences and issues concerning young people in 2012 but also displayed the talent of our young journalists. ‘Art by Offenders’ by Isabel Chapman ‘Police Stop and Search: What About Young People’s Voices?’ by Monique Lane ‘Not Giving Up On The Job’ by James ‘Youth Crime Levels Fall Yet Fear of Youth Crime Rising’ by Dave Rublin ‘Unpaid Internships Do Nothing For Social Mobility’ by Manon ‘The University Dilemma’ by Sakib ‘Trying To Choose An Ethical Career Path? Maybe It’s Not The One You Think’ by Ben ‘Should 16-17 year olds Be Allowed To Vote?’ by Hana ‘Abda Kazemi: Life as a Member of Youth Parliament’ by Abda Kazemi ‘Freezing Minimum Wage, Leaving Youth In The Cold’ by Aaron We look forward to what 2013 will bring for the 99 Percent Campaign Blog, wishing you all a Happy New...
Mesut Ozil + Bambi = Social Cohesion

Mesut Ozil + Bambi = Social Cohesion

How a Turkish German and an award named after a Disney character can possibly help Britain’s failing record on Multiculturalism. Mesut Ozil has impressed everyone with his attacking displays for Real Madrid and Germany respectively. But it’s not just his football prowess that has attracted attention. Ozil is also a winner of the prestigious BAMBI award in Germany. The BAMBI  awards are presented annually by Hubert Burda Media to recognise excellence in international media and television “with vision and creativity who affected and inspired the German public that year,” both domestic and foreign. First held in 1948, they are the oldest media awards in Germany. The award is named after Felix Salten‘s book Bambi, A Life in the Woods and its statuettes are in the shape of the novel’s titular fawn character. Walt Disney take a bow. So what has that got to with Mesut Ozil? Mesut Ozil is a third generation Turkish German, and a reflection of the close relationship between Germany and Turkey.  Germany has been in contact with Turkey since the 17th and 18th centuries when the Ottoman Turks attempted to expand their territories beyond the north Balkan territories. Turkey also fought on the German side in the First World War. Furthermore, the large-scale of immigration of Turkish workers from the beginning of the 1960s was on the one hand, due to the high population growth and mass unemployment within Turkey, and on the other, due to the demand for labour in north-west Europe. As the biggest foreign population in Germany, Turkish and people of Turkish origin are the main figurehead of most German cities. Döner Kebab has become traditional German food. Turkish politicians are campaigning for...
‘Why Vote?’ A Film For Young Voters

‘Why Vote?’ A Film For Young Voters

Catch21 Productions has produced ‘Why Vote?’ for Parliament Week 2012. Young people created the film, and it focuses on why it is important for the younger generation to vote and have an interest in politics. Parliament Week took place between 19 to 25 November and is an annual series of events and activities, co-ordinated by the House of Commons and House of Lords, which aim to raise awareness of Parliament and encourage people to engage with the UK’s democratic system and its institutions. Within the film, there are appearances from members of the Youth Parliament and  politicians including Tim Noughton MP and Lisa Nandy MP. So have a look it may just change your opinion on voting if you haven’t started yet....
2012 Autumn Statement: young and unemployed still left in the cold

2012 Autumn Statement: young and unemployed still left in the cold

As George Osborne and the sniggering millionaires of the Coalition front bench delivered their autumn statement last Wednesday, it was impossible not to feel a sense of déjà vu. Here we are again, with the chancellor admitting that he had failed to meet the deficit target, failed to meet the debt target and failed to restore significant growth to the economy. Here we are again with the continuation of austerity despite its failure to even succeed on its own terms, to say nothing of its terrible social legacy. No matter how high unemployment remains, no matter how many disabled people die after being declared fit for work and no matter how sluggish the recovery remains, Osborne is determined to stay the course. As one senior treasury official put it, “We do have a plan B: it’s to keep doing plan A for longer”.  So what will the consequences of the relentless pursuit of plan A be for young people in Britain? The major headline from Osborne’s statement was his real-terms cut to the welfare budget, amounting to £10 billion by 2018. The effect this will have on young people will be painful, particularly through the corrosive effects it will have on families. Camden Council began to research the effects of austerity on families earlier this year via a series of interviews, and the findings were grim; the researchers noted rising tensions among families, more arguments, panic about the future and even a rise in domestic violence. This is a toxic environment for young people to grow up in, and will only aggravated as yet another raid on the welfare...