Thoughts from the 2013 IARS Annual Conference

Thoughts from the 2013 IARS Annual Conference

Although only a couple of weeks since joining the 99% Campaign I have learned so much about the issues silenced in our society and what the power of knowledge can do to give it a voice. We all know that Britain is a developed, modern and multicultural state but what we tend to overlook is the fact that it is not a problem-free country. In other words, one of the biggest problems in Britain today is the fact that certain issues and community groups are relegated to the bottom of policy and funding agendas. This in my view is mainly the reason why the conference was very productive. It made me personally question how much I knew about my community and the problems faced by everyday suffering from hard hitting public spending cuts to welfare and criminal justice system.To start from the typical, I have always been interested in politics but till joining the 99% Campaign Editorial Team I did not realise the amount of social issues that remain invisible to us. This year’s annual IARS conference took place under the theme “Listening to Community Evidence: Race, Gender and Restorative Justice”. As the title suggests this was not only a research-sharing meeting by professionals but a gathering involving those most affected by government policies and those community voices which are unheard. These voices included victims of crime, ex-offenders and workers who are at risk of losing their jobs in a time of austerity. The IARS event was a fantastic opportunity to participate in social discussions and to learn more about the academic findings and developments for a fairer and more...
My Experience of the IARS Annual Conference, 2013

My Experience of the IARS Annual Conference, 2013

On Friday the 6th December, I was lucky enough to go to the Middle Temple to document the IARS Annual Conference along with other 99% Campaign members. We all had different roles involving filming, photography, interviewing and documenting the conference using social media. The three talks were; ‘Pushing the Barriers of Restorative Justice, and Rehabilitation Through Psychology’, ‘No More Abuse For Refuge and Asylum Seeking Women’ and ‘Race Equality in a Changing Criminal Justice System’. As mentioned previously, we also had the chance to interview the speakers away from the conference on a one to one basis, to ask them more about the organizations they were representing on the panel, with two other members of the campaign filming each interview. The interviews were a great opportunity to demonstrate that young people were actively involved and interested in what happens in our society, as well as being able to understand it. What was great about the conference for me was the audience involvement. People from all different communities had the opportunity to stand up and ask questions to the Key Note Speakers and panelists and share their views or challenge the ones that they didn’t agree with. My favourite talk was ‘Race equality in a changing criminal justice system’.  As I’m very interested in issues surrounding race in the government and it is still   a widely debated issue. One of the speakers Janett Brown (who works with the London Probation Trust) interviewed two people as part of her speech.One of them explained how she had experienced crime and difficult circumstances throughout her life and how she felt the government failed her in terms of what they...
The Power of Social Media

The Power of Social Media

  Since joining the 99% Campaign in October, I have learned a lot about the power of social media. I have always been relatively active online and have Twitter, Facebook and WordPress accounts, but did not realise the extent to which I can use these platforms as more than just a means of social interaction. We set up our 99% Campaign Facebook page in November, and since then have acquired nearly 300 ‘likes’. However, I cannot count the number of occasions that members of family, friends and even acquaintances have asked me all about it, having come across the page and our posts on Facebook; a true reflection of just how easy it now is to reach a wide number of people, simply by posting something online. Before the 99%, though I had Twitter, I was definitely not what you would call an expert. Yet, I have been amazed by the connections that have stemmed from it. Through Twitter, I have been in touch with at least four other youth organisations, two of which we are now looking to collaborate with. Not only, then, is it a way of raising awareness and amplifying your voice to thousands of people, but a channel through which genuine connections can be made. It is always so great to see so many people favouriting and retweeting our posts, as I am sure it is for our Editorial Team members. These platforms are neither difficult to access or use. Just about any young person with internet access is able to freely publish their work, which will potentially reach thousands of people. With the added...
Other Side of the Coin: Teenage Abuse of Parents

Other Side of the Coin: Teenage Abuse of Parents

From Oliver Twist to Cinderella, the idea of overly oppressive parenting is not new and beyond the world of children’s fiction, there is much data showing that parental control transform into violence against children. While child abuse is horrendous, it is at least widely recognised, giving authorities and charities the opportunity to tackle it. There is, however, another aspect of domestic violence which often goes un-reported. This is the reciprocal to parental abuse of children: it is parental abuse by children. New research by Oxford University suggests teenage abuse of parents is a widespread problem, with over 1,892 reported cases of 13-19 year-olds committing violent assaults against their own parents in 2009-10. In interviews with the researchers, parents who had been abused by their children described feelings of intense shame and a belief that the violence of their children was a consequence of their own failings as parents. This, along with a fear of the consequences for their children if they reported the problem, led many adults abused by teenagers to avoid contacting police. It is therefore difficult to know how many cases of parental abuse by children there really are. But why is parental abuse by children happening? This 2010 report by Parentline Plus suggests that there are socio-economic factors which can make teens aggressive towards their parents. One such factor is parental unemployment. Research has shown that children whose parents are unemployed are 3 to 4 times more likely to have an emotional or conduct disorder. Furthermore, children from households with the lowest 20% of incomes have a three-fold increased risk of mental health problems than children...
Youth Unemployment: How Different is Spain to England?

Youth Unemployment: How Different is Spain to England?

Youth unemployment is a global problem that is growing at an alarming rate. There is a lot of technical information and jargon on this subject in the mass media, which only specialists are able to understand. We are two Spanish journalists aged 24 and 27, living in the UK and who have also been affected by youth unemployment. It because of our experience we would like to explore the meaning of youth unemployment and all the problems that belong to it. We are going to focus on two European countries: Spain and England. We are also going to interview an economist to understand the current statistics on unemployment. Furthermore, we would like to interview some Spanish and English young people to give us their opinion on this problem and have a wide sight of the situation. First of all, we need to make clear that population is divided between active and inactive people. Inside the active population we can divide them between employed and unemployed. We are going to focus on the last ones. The current financial crisis has been growing little by little since 2008 and seems that it still has a long way to go. The youth are one of the most affected sections of society suffering unemployment because young people find it hard to access the labour market. The main reason of this high unemployment rate is because most of the young people is still studying or maybe combining the studies with a part time jobs. Otherwise, the companies do not use to hire inexperienced people and the graduates find hard to get the first job....