Call for Creative Volunteers – 99% Campaign Magazine

Call for Creative Volunteers – 99% Campaign Magazine

The 99% Campaign is recruiting a group of young people aged 16-25 to develop and design their very own youth-focused magazine. We are looking for young bloggers, illustrators,  photographers, aspiring film-makers to advocate passionately for youth issues. About the 99% Campaign The 99% Campaign is a youth-led initiative that aims to dispel negative stereotypes of young people, and to promote their involvement in decision-making processes and civic life. The Campaign is funded by Nominet Trust and is hosted by Independent Academic Research Studies (IARS), an independent think-tank with a charitable mission to give everyone a chance to forge a safer, fairer and more inclusive society. With the successful launch of our first annual magazine, we are offering a platform for young people to express their views: to debate the most important youth issues; and to be a voice for change in our communities. In doing so, negative perceptions about young people will be challenged by the very people who are subjected to them. The magazine will demonstrate the positive contributions of young people in society by showcasing the work of young activists, writers and creative designers. To top it off, the work of the team will be presented at our much anticipated Research and Leadership Awards 2014, which will be attended by key public figures across the government, youth media and community sector. What skills and experience we are looking for This is a perfect opportunity for young people who are interested in journalism and creative arts, and have a keen interest in current issues that affect young people. We are looking for people that also have a strong knowledge of all mainstream social media platforms and...
What does it mean to be young?

What does it mean to be young?

Being young is not about comparing your age to an arbitrary range of numbers. Nor is it about the lack of wrinkles on your forehead, nor the amount of hair attached onto your scalp. To be young is to be excited about the ever-changing fashions, to stay up all night talking, and to think that time is air. We like to switch majors ten times, move in and out of relationships, and sleep in whenever possible. It is not conformity that drives us, but nonconformity. It used to be that graduation was one with marriage and family. The gap of adolescence was small, and the traditional sense of adulthood was the natural progressive stage in life. But in the post-industrial society we live in, this model breaks down. Education and training are more crucial than ever before to secure a job in an economy where entry-level positions are subsiding. Young people know this precisely, and that’s why we want to get ahead. One of the greatest things about higher education is that we change–we develop. We are guided by new ways of thinking and inspired by new people we meet along the way. As a result, transitory decisions sustain a quest for identity, exploring the possible life paths and relationships. Changing social norms also fuel the extension of adolescence. In the United Kingdom, 22% of households were headed by a single parent in 2011 compared to 8% in 1971. Naturally, our generation is less concerned about fitting into society’s standards compared to previous generations. Today’s technological advances help to nurture our curiosity even further, enabling us to travel to all four corners of the...
Sexual Health Awards 2014

Sexual Health Awards 2014

The sexual health awards take place annually as part of a celebration of sexual health to celebrate the work of those who wouldn’t be recognised for their hard work in the fight to improve sexual health in the United Kingdom. The awards night, on Friday 14th March 2014, consisted of awards such as, Sexual Health Professional of the Year, Young Person of the Year, The Pamela Sheridan Sex and Relationships Education Award and the Sexual Health Media Campaign/Storyline of the year. The evening began in The Old Billiard Room and Annex, as waiters with trays of alcohol walked around the room, offering a glass to every person entering.  The room was alive with people talking to each other, while music played in the background. At about 7.15pm, everyone was escorted to the ballroom, where Jenny Eclair, stand-up comic and winner of the prestigious Perrier Award at the Edinburgh festival, immaculately, hosted the award ceremony, humouring the crowd with her witty antics. Of the category “The Pamela Sheridan Sex and Relationships Education award,” was the “Oii My Size” campaign. The campaign has been designed and developed by a group of teenage girls, focusing on helping young girls aged 10-18. Through their website and app, supported by workshops, their aim is to help teenage girls voice their opinion to teenage boys about how they would like to be approached. Discussing issues such as sexting, chat up lines, how to deal with certain situations and what is normal. They have also made boys more aware about treating girls with more respect and speaking to girls on a more intellectual level, rather than...
Libby Page: on unpaid internships, blogging and starting out as a journalist

Libby Page: on unpaid internships, blogging and starting out as a journalist

Libby Page works at Guardian Students as a content co-ordinator. She is an active campaigner for Intern Aware, has protested at London Fashion Week and spoken at parliament. Ellie:  We keep hearing how young people are excluded from the mainstream, that and they are not accurately represented in the media or given a voice in society. How much do you think citizen journalism and blogging can give young people a voice? Libby: Blogging is a great way to find a voice and share issues that are important to you as a young person. I started out by writing my own blog but also pitching blogs to Blogging Students at Guardian Students. It was partly through that writing that I then came to work here after graduating. Any student can pitch a blog: (http://www.theguardian.com/education/mortarboard/2013/sep/23/blogging-students-how-to-pitch-and-blog). It’s a great way to get your writing out there to a global audience. Having your own blog is also a great way to develop your own writing- the more you write the more you’ll discover what really interests you. Ellie: In your opinion, what do you think is the most important issue affecting young people today?     Libby: There are lots of issues that affect young people. The one that I have done a lot of campaigning on is unpaid internships, so I’d mention that as it’s the subject I know the most about. Long unpaid internships cut off people who can’t afford to work for free and create a society where young people are held back from opportunities not because they’re not talented, but because they can’t afford to work for free.  Ellie:  For hopeful journalists...
Should Graduates Step Back from the Debate on Youth Unemployment?

Should Graduates Step Back from the Debate on Youth Unemployment?

Last month, I attended the 99% Campaign’s parliamentary event on youth unemployment in Westminster. The event was extremely well-attended, and the debate could have gone on for many hours longer than it did. At times though, it felt as if there were two separate discussions going on about two different types of youth unemployment. Many of the panelists wanted to discuss unemployment among school leavers and the weakness of various measures designed to help them–from careers advice in schools to apprenticeships. However, many of young people present were recent graduates for whom “youth unemployment” meant them and their friends being unable to find work after graduation. Before the event, I instinctively found myself in the latter camp. I will graduate from a Master’s Degree in September, and not a day goes by when I don’t worry about what comes next. For me and many other recent graduates, there is a feeling that life has changed the rules of the game right at the moment of our greatest triumph. As the meeting went on though, my attitude began to shift. Some of the older panelists began to discuss their own experiences of unemployment after graduating from university. The idea that a few months of post-graduate economic inactivity would be devastating to an individual’s long term ambitions and prospects was difficult to reconcile with the fact that these stories were coming from the director of a major think tank and an MP. When you enquire a little further, you realise that countless successful people have had a stage of their life in their early twenties where they struggled to find a place...