Environmental Activism or Environmental Extremism

Environmental Activism or Environmental Extremism

Introduction Several peaceful protest organisations including Extinction Rebellion (XR), Greenpeace and Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament have all recently been included in police counter-terror documents and been labelled as ‘key threats’ (Grierson and Scott: 2020). Although it has been said that the document was designed to help de-radicalisation efforts, the inclusion of such environmental and pacifist groups on a list alongside well-known terrorists, white nationalists, far-right and neo-Nazi hate groups, has been heavily criticised. Similarly, adding groups such as Extinction Rebellion (XR) as part of the Prevent programme, which trains teachers and others who work with young and vulnerable people to spot the signs of radicalisation has raised further questions. The growing criticism is therefore mainly due to the grouping of environmental activists and campaigners together with terrorist organisations. Is this going to help fight terrorism? Or does it rather threaten the right of individuals to engage in peaceful protest on such a concerning issue like that of the current climate crisis? The current climate issues are increasingly becoming a serious threat to the world. Millions of people are already suffering from the catastrophic effects of extreme disasters exacerbated by climate change. This is most evident in the global South which has already witnessed prolonged drought in sub-Saharan Africa to devastating tropical storms and floods across Southeast Asia (Amnesty International, n.d.). Such environmental disasters are therefore going to further magnify already existing inequalities. The continuous climate change devastations, therefore, make it a necessity now more than ever, to take action and hold governments and businesses accountable particularly when the top 100 companies are responsible for over 70% of the world’s...
Does COVID-19 affect everyone the same?

Does COVID-19 affect everyone the same?

A few weeks ago, who would have thought that one third of the world would now be facing the completely new and unexpected situation of self-isolating and national lockdown? The coronavirus outbreak, recently described by the World Health Organization as a pandemic, is probably the greatest crisis of our generation. Health workers are giving their best on the frontline of this global fight. Scientists are making every effort to discover an effective vaccine. Governments struggle not to show impotence, by taking appropriate measures and giving the much needed practical advice to the public, without creating panic, which the mainstream media manifestly manage to grow quite sufficiently. Schools, universities, businesses and factories are being shut down and the general public is quarantined, under great stress, since the biggest part of the population is forced to working from home, or worse, not working at all. In these uncertain and challenging times, it is crucial that we stand up for each other and that all citizens remain healthy, both physically and mentally, as well as politically empowered. Although COVID-19 doesn’t discriminate on who it is going to infect, it does underline the inequalities in our societies, as we do not have the same recourses to cope with it. Certain groups of people struggle more than others, like in every crisis. Novel coronavirus is not only a public health threat, but a social and financial crisis. The most vulnerable of our communities are going to suffer the most because of the pandemic. How are all the precarious workers, young people in the gig economy, unsecured immigrants, and asylum seekers going to withstand the...
OPEN CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

OPEN CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

IARS is organizing a writing competition as part of the Community Outreach to contribute to the intellectual outputs of the Youth Empowerment and Innovation Project (YEIP). We are interested in broadcasting European voices of young people, focusing on the topics that matter to them. YEIP aims to tackle radicalisation through youth empowerment and social inclusion. Articles will be published in the youth-led magazine 99% . We will select the best blog posts to be edited by Dr. Gavrielides and published in our annual magazine to be launched at IARS International Conference at the University of East London. You can write about any angle that you want but you will have more chances to get published if you cover a topic that hasn’t been covered. We are specially interested in the topics below *Environmental activism and youth radicalisation. Extinction rebellion. (worldwide) *Youth radicalisation and Facebook. Analytica case. (worldwide) *Youth radicalisation and social media. The twitter case. (worldwide) *Gender issues and radicalisation – focus on the Incel movement, Gamegate and extreme feminism (worldwide) *LGTB communities facing radical resistance (worldwide) *Poverty and youth radicalisation (UK/EU/worldwide) *Challenges of different faiths and radicalisation (EU/worldwide) *Positive case studies of de-radicalisation (UK/EU/worldwide) *Entrepreneurship projects to tackle youth radicalisation. (UK/EU/worldwide) The following topics have ALREADY been allocated to a young writer *Youth radicalisation and social media. Focusing on Instagram. (worldwide) *Restorative justice as an approach to combat youth radicalisation (UK) *White supremacist and youth radicalisation (USA) *Islamic radicalisation in british youth (UK) *Poverty and youth radicalisation (UK) *Mental Health and radicalisation (European/Worldwide) *Schools and their approaches in tackling youth radicalisation (UK) We want to give you as...
Survey of youth NGOs and networks in Europe is now open

Survey of youth NGOs and networks in Europe is now open

The survey is being carried out by Ecorys, an independent research organisation, on behalf of the European Commission. It forms part of a study on the changing landscape of youth representation in the EU (EAC/17/2019). The aims are: to map EU youth NGOs and networksto assess the contribution and impact of EU fundingto identify the new trends in youth participation; and,to make future funding recommendations. The survey should take around 15-20 minutes to complete online. Taking part is voluntary, and your data will be treated as confidential. The findings will be published in a final report, to inform the rollout of the EU Youth Strategy (2019-27). You may start the survey by clicking on the link below. Should you be unable to complete all the survey in one sitting please don’t hesitate to return back to the survey at any time by clicking on the link below: Start survey The survey will remain open until Friday 16th August 2019. If you have any queries or require any technical help please don’t hesitate to contact us...
EUROPEAN YOUTH LEADING THE WAY  FOR EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION

EUROPEAN YOUTH LEADING THE WAY FOR EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION

International youth conference to be held by the IARS International Institute at Lewisham College on the 16th and 17th July. The conference shall bring together young people with European and British key decision makers, academics, teachers, policymakers and youth agencies to tackle the issues of opportunity and enterprise, whilst equipping young participants with the skills they need to succeed. The conference is free for students and youth workers and is supported by the European Commission’s Erasmus+ programme. Youthpass and CPD accredited event. Dr. Theo Gavrielides, IARS Founder and Director, said: “We look forward to welcoming as many young people and decision makers as possible to this international and timely event. At a critical point in time for the UK and Europe, we hope that our youth-led approach and the Erasmus project results that we will be launching will help alleviate poverty and disadvantage for our young people”. By providing access to prominent policymakers, educationalists and employers, young people will pitch their questions to those directly at the heart of Europe’s youth unemployment crisis. Speakers include Simon Chambers policy lead at the British Council, Janet Daby MP, renowned academics and members of IARS Youth Advisory Board.  “The UK’s membership of the European Union has offered opportunities for learning, training and employment for hundreds of thousands of young people. Programmes like Erasmus+, the Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications and freedom of movement have helped give meaning to aspiration and social mobility for generations of young people who feel they are truly European citizens. With uncertainty at its height it is vital that we fight to protect or replicate these benefits and...