Press Release: IARS 4th Research and Youth Leadership Awards Winners 2015 Announced

Press Release: IARS 4th Research and Youth Leadership Awards Winners 2015 Announced

14 Young Role Models and youth projects were recognised for their roles in our communities Around 100 young people, representatives of youth organisations attended this year’s IARS Research and Youth Leadership Awards 2015, in partnership with the 99% Campaign that took place last night at the Canada Water Culture Space in London. The Awards, now on its 4th year recognise and champion young people and their initiatives in their communities as drivers for social change. This unique youth-led event, organised by a group of young people involved in the IARS Youth Advisory Board, hosted influential keynote speakers in the field of youth policy and practice, including Howard Williamson CBE FRSA FHEA, Professor of European Youth Policy, University of South Wales, Justin Pettit, Human Rights Officer at the Commonwealth Secretariat, Mak Chisty, Commander for Engagement in the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and Mark Parker, I LIVE IN SE16 Coordinator. 14 inspirational young people and projects from up and down the UK were awarded in 7 categories, designed carefully to cover a broad area of truly youth-led projects, skills and competences, supported by leading businesses  and organisations across the UK. The Winners for 2015 are : Youth Research Project Award – Sponsored by Buckinghamshire New University Winner: Eloise Peabody Rolf – The ‘Volunteer’s Perspective’ of the Hampshire Community Peer Court programme Runner Up: Karolina Kombert: Young people, homelessness, UK welfare reform and food poverty in Scotland, published in the Youth Voice Journal. Community Leader Award – Sponsored by  Community Action Southwark Winners: Kike Ibikunle and Ijeoma Datha-Moore for their contributions to the Just for Kids Law team as volunteers and ambassadors. Runner Up: Jack Samuel David Wilson for his exemplar campaigning...
PLAY: K(NO)w Before You Buy”!

PLAY: K(NO)w Before You Buy”!

K(NO)W BEFORE YOU BUY is half real life and half digital SOCIAL GAME. Together, we are going to visualize a world with a healthy alcohol consumption and responsible alcohol sales. ”The Home Office has announced it will ban the sale of cheap alcohol in England and Wales and set a “floor price” on a bottle of wine of £2.24. Taking effect from April 2014, the scheme is aimed at tackling the problem of binge drinking in Britain”, says Lydia Smith of the International Business Times in an article titled ”Will Banning Cheap Alcohol Solve UK’s Binge Drinking Problem?”. It appears difficult to find a good solution to reduce binge drinking and make everyone concerned aware of all the issues related to irresponsible alcohol sale and consumption. To address that challenge, IARS and its 99% Campaign has joined ‘It’s the Drink Talking’ – a youth-driven initiative, hosted by Alcohol Concern. We need your help and ideas to crate a MAP for a better and healthier society. Let’s play “what if?”- What would happen if we were always mindful when buying alcohol and drinking it? How would our lives change? What would happen if our cities were attacked by money hungry shop and super market owners  selling cheap booze to young people without checking their ID. And isn’t it true that cheap alcohol deals may result in young people drinking more? What if we were detectives and secret agents on a mission to spy on and report harmful alcohol promotions and  failure to check ID? To play the game you need to contribute stories, create blogs, videos, art, comic-book style story, sound and photojournalism projects and post your work on our Facebook Page – No Before You Buy. The best stories will appear at the top...
Welcome to Our New Editorial Board Members!

Welcome to Our New Editorial Board Members!

 The 99% Campaign Editorial Board Team 2014/2015   The 99% Campaign welcomes new Editorial Board members. Following a careful selection, the eight new nationally and internationally active young people have been invited to join our Editorial Board. Altogether, the Editorial Board is composed of 10 creative journalists with wide-ranging areas of expertise. Their primary responsibility is to write the 99% Campaign’s’s editorials, which represent the voice of the board, its editor and the community. This year’s main themes are: Social Inclusion (age, disability, migration, gender, race, class), Digital Activism (new forms of civil and political participation), Education in Crisis (marketisation vs. access) and Crime (social construction and popular perceptions). Check our articles and news highlights regularly or follow us on Facebook or Twitter for news of our latest events, functions and...
99% Campaign partners with No Hate Movement

99% Campaign partners with No Hate Movement

The Independent Academic Research Studies (IARS) and its 99% Campaign has recently joined the No Hate Speech Movement which aims to reduce hate speech and promote digital activism. Campaign’s objectives are as follows: To raise awareness about hate speech online and its risks for democracy and for individual young people; To promote media and Internet literacy; To involve young people to stand up for human rights, online and offline; To mobilise, train and network online youth activists for human rights; To show support and solidarity to the people and groups targeted by hate speech online; To advocate for the development and consensus on European policy instruments combating hate speech; To decrease the levels of acceptance of online hate speech. We aim to release e-tools and deliver workshops to reduce hate crime in the UK. Join...
Top 5 Apps for Activists

Top 5 Apps for Activists

Having a smartphone these days is like having a set of keys to your house – a must have and an essential part of our daily lives. Smartphone usage has already crossed the 1 billion mark and is likely to double by 2015. Yep we are all tapping away at our phones, looking for the latest news and chatting to our friends. But what does this mean for people living in fear of their lives and who are looking for new platforms to escape torture and abuse by governments and harmful groups? Political activists are now using mobile phone apps to get their views heard and to help communicate their stories to people across borders. Below are our top 5 apps that help individuals to do just that – organise for social change and make some noise! Apps for activists | Create Infographics Amnesty International’s Panic Button Amnesty International has recently released its Panic Button app for Android. This new tool (which can be set to appear as a simple calculator) provides important protection for dissidents and activists, basically keeping them out of jail.  By transforming a smart phone into a secret alarm this app will help protect those who are at real risk at any time, of being kidnapped, arrested or disappeared in nations across the globe. Crucially, this means fellow activists can act straight away in response. The trigger is activated when the user rapidly presses the phones power button (five times in five seconds until a vibration occurs), which sends a message to selected contacts and a GPS location. It also features a disguise feature, requiring...
Looking Beyond Negative Stereotypes of Young People

Looking Beyond Negative Stereotypes of Young People

Considering the still fragile state of youth employment in the UK it is no surprise that job prospects are high on the mind of young people today. When society is concerned over the impact of irresponsible portrayals of sex on young people to the extent, it makes headlines and sparks debate, why does the media not recognise the potential impact of their own negative coverage? The impact of “image pressure” coming from media representations, for example, has been widely discussed, along with the potentially devastating effects of cyberbullying. According to a new report by Demos, an analysis of six UK newspapers over the past 10 years found that the words most often linked with “teenagers”, “youth” and “young people” were “binge-drinking”, “yobs” and “crime”. It also said four in five teens felt they are unfairly represented in the media and, of these, 85% said this is affecting their chances of getting a job.  Yet this is nothing new, Dr. Abigail Wills argues in her own analysis of anti-social youth in Britain throughout history. All generations have ‘ardently believed that an unprecedented “crisis” in youth behaviour is taking place’ when in fact there is no evidence to suggest that youth are becoming more immoral, whether this be comic books or ‘video nasties’. Today concerns primarily deal with ‘the decline in mutual respect and social cohesion, the dominance of anti-social behaviour, materialism and the cult of celebrity. While these concerns do have some basis, to judge all young people by these representations is unfair. Demos based their own conclusions on a survey of more than 1,000 people aged 14 to 17...