“Abused No More: Safeguarding Youth and Empowering Professionals”

Abused No More The ‘Abused no More: Safeguarding Youth and Empowering Professionals’ (AnM) is a ground breaking, evidence based e-book written within the framework of Erasmus + Key Action 2 for Youth. The book was written within a 3 year youth led programme that aimed to create, support, develop and serve a strategic partnership in the area of youth-led training, educational and awareness raising activities that will allow better integration of marginalised youth, particularly those from migrant groups, and with an emphasis on gender based violence. The e-book brings evidence from the UK, Poland, Cyprus, Romania and Italy while analyzing the emergent findings in a comparative perspective for Europe. The legal literacy of marginalised youth at risk of social exclusion was assessed while particular emphasis was put on different types of abuse faced by young migrant women. The eBook features a comparative chapter reviewing current practice across Europe as well as chapters in Greek, Italian and Polish. Recommendations for future policy  and practice are formulated to help protect this particularly marginalised group of young people. Over the last 3 years, professionals, young people and LGBT migrants have benefited from freely available, tailored online training tools and resources resulting from both projects. The tools aim to increase users’ knowledge and confidence as well as to strengthen professionals’ capacity in providing tailored and successful services. https://www.abusednomore.org/download/852/  ...

The Civil Society Strategy: Engaging Young People

As a young person volunteering at the IARS International Institute, it is encouraging to see the how the Civil Society Strategy has emphasised the crucial role of young people in shaping the future of our society. The Strategy outlines government’s commitment to ensuring that all young people have opportunities to develop the skills, networks and resilience that can improve their life chances, fulfil their potential and to support them to avoid negative pathways in future. The Civil Society Strategy’s strengths certainly lie in the youth engagement and youth-led approaches. After reviewing the Strategy, it was exciting to see that the Strategy co-operates with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in developing proposals to help young people play their part. Some other highly positive aspects of the Strategy covered the youth voice commitments, the involvement of young people in policy design, and setting out three new youth voice projects, which are: A Civil Society Youth Steering Group set up within the DCMS to oversee the development and implementation of policies affecting young people, including the plans set out in the Civil Society Strategy. DCMS will also set up a national Young Commissioners and Inspectors Group to involve young people directly and meaningfully in the commissioning, monitoring and evaluation of national programmes affecting young people. With respect to future policy, the government will build systems to ensure that young people both have their views heard and are able to play a role in delivery. As a youth-led institute and expert in youth-led research, IARS has its own youth steering group – the Youth Advisory Board (YAB) – which...

Young Carers Conference: Barriers to Employment

On Monday 26th March at Dulwich Library, 5pm-7pm, the IARS International Institute is hosting the conference Young Carers: Barriers to Employment.  At the conference, the IARS will present the findings of their year long project ”Young Carers Matter” and engage young carers and professionals to discuss the findings and share their experiences. The ”Young Carers Matter” project was designed to recognise young carers’ unique skill sets and help potential employers understand how valuable these can be, and provided training to both young carers and professionals to support young carers into employment. There are limited spaces available, so click here to register or email e.lanham@iars.org.uk to RSVP. Agenda to follow. We hope to see you...

Call For Papers: 99% Magazine Looking For Young Writers

Are you between the ages of 16-30? Are you passionate about issues facing young people today and interested in getting your voice heard? The 99% Campaign Magazine is looking for writers for its annual issue! We are especially looking for young people who are interested in writing about topics such as; youth unemployment, entrepreneurship and employability, youth radicalisation, the issues facing young carers, equality and anti-discrimination, and the impact of Brexit on young people. The 99% Campaign Magazine is a unique youth-led magazine promoting the positive and creative contributions of young people. By providing a platform where young people are able to express themselves and write about issues that face young people today, the 99% Campaign Magazine aims to make society more inclusive, fair and responsive to young people’s views and realities. If you are interested and would like to contribute, please send a 1000-2500 word article to Internship@iars.org.uk. We also welcome other creative contributions (e.g. interviews, poems or photoshoots).  ...

What Age is too Young to be a Young Carer?

On Monday 11 November 2017, the Evening Standard announced that they are going to start an investigation called The Lost Childhoods. The aim of this new investigation is to bring to light all of the children in London who are vulnerable to “poverty, homelessness, disability, mental health and abuse” (Cohen). In his first article, writer David Cohen interviews Beau Broomfield, an eight year old boy who is serving as his sick mother’s full time carer. Beau describes himself as a very worried child and knows that most kids his age do not have the struggles that he deals with on a daily basis. Ever since he came home to his mum collapsed on the floor, he has taken it upon himself to handle all of her medical needs and house work. He reminds her when to take her pills, helps her move about the house, prepares meals, does laundry, and goes to school. In his mind he knows that he should be out playing with the rest of his 8 year old friends, but his response was “I am worried to leave mum so I stay here” (Broomfield). Unfortunately, Beau’s case is not unique to London’s young people. According to the Children’s Commissioner of England “there are 171,024 young unpaid carers under 18 (in London alone). Some are just under five years old” (Cohen). The reason that the numbers are so high is because many families cannot afford to hire a professional carer, so they rely on their children to take care of them. Beau’s mother, Rose Coffen, for example, has been classified as an ‘in need’ patient, but...
European Solidarity Corps

European Solidarity Corps

Launched under a year ago by the European Union, The European Solidarity Corps is the newest project to get young people out of their comfort zones and out changing the world. With already over 23,000 young people between the ages of 18-30 participating, European Solidarity Corps provides opportunities for Europeans to work or volunteer abroad. Each placement is geared to help both the participant and the people they meet understand the importance of global solidarity. It is all about adapting to other opinions and cultures, while promoting human rights. Young people who want to apply must be open-minded. All of the jobs will require engaging in pluralism, non-discrimination, tolerance, justice, and equality. Additionally, they must be creative because it is encouraged to develop meaningful ways to change society while respecting the culture they are in. Some project examples include: helping to rebuild a school or community centre, supporting newly arrive asylum seekers, clearing vegetation to prevent wildfires, or working with disabled people in a community centre. There are two ways that a young person can get involved with the European Solidarity Corps: volunteering or occupational activities. If one were to opt to volunteer they would have a permanent location for anywhere between 2 and 12 months. This sector is closely related to Erasmus+, so it is common to get funding from the EU to keep up with expenses. Because the work they will be doing is unpaid, volunteers receiving money for travel, accommodation, insurance, meals, and a small amount for living expenses. Those who opt to obtain a job and participate in the occupational activities sector will be paid...