Young Politicians 5

Young Politicians 5

BINARY IDENTITY, 21 HACKTIVIST “The education system needs to teach children how to teach themselves.” This person has remained anonymous with only the online name Binary Identity given and the age of 21. He is a hacktivist for the group Anonymous, who use the internet as a method of political activism. What is Anonymous? Anonymous is an idea. There is no political affiliation. There is no religious affiliation. We are the 99% against the ruling 1%. We are known to use the Internet to combat global issues and also communicate our message globally. We are not governed, there are no social boundaries and no leader. We find commonality in all people from every country, religion and cultures. The Internet community is becoming conscious of Anonymous, and fundamentally, the idea that we outnumber those that oppress. What is the biggest problems facing young people? The biggest problems young people have in this day and age are so many it’s hard to point out just one. But I can tell you there has never been a time in history, other than now, that they are confronted with such unique and difficult problems. Society has made it very difficult for kids to just be kids. If they do not conform they are drugged or labelled, they are pressured in all sorts of ways to be this or be that. Ideally I believe we all have talents and educators should find those talents in each individual and feed that fire instead of trying to force them to all be the same and in competition with one another. The education system needs to teach...
Young Politician Portraits

Young Politician Portraits

Political disempowerment should not be confused with apathy. Our generation is regularly stereotyped as being “lazy” and “apathetic,” accused of being “switched off” from politics. According to some figures, a whopping 60% of young people will not vote in the 2015 general election and up to 800,000 young Brits are missing from the voters’ register. Are young people really so careless about politics? Would they rather spend more time playing GTA 5 than engage in their local community? Or are there other reasons they choose not to vote? I interviewed many young people in the streets while working on my ‘Young London’ project for The 99% Campaign. I found many of the young people I spoke to to be angry, disillusioned, disconnected and frustrated by UK politics. Some would claim not to be political at all but resented the way their community was being run, others showed a passion for political change but wanted to work with alternatives to traditional party policy. Most of them said they did not vote; some would opt to spoil their ballots or vote for alternative parties rather than support mainstream politics. I began this project in an effort to understand this problem more clearly by listening to the views of politically-active young people of all types. From a Young UKIP leader to an online “hacktivist,” I investigated their opinions on youth issues, particularly political disenfranchisement. Overall, they critically challenged the stereotype of apathetic and careless youth portrayed in media and by politicians. They are in the streets protesting, or influencing parties to connect them with youth issues. They are turning their dissatisfaction into...
Libby Page: on unpaid internships, blogging and starting out as a journalist

Libby Page: on unpaid internships, blogging and starting out as a journalist

Libby Page works at Guardian Students as a content co-ordinator. She is an active campaigner for Intern Aware, has protested at London Fashion Week and spoken at parliament. Ellie:  We keep hearing how young people are excluded from the mainstream, that and they are not accurately represented in the media or given a voice in society. How much do you think citizen journalism and blogging can give young people a voice? Libby: Blogging is a great way to find a voice and share issues that are important to you as a young person. I started out by writing my own blog but also pitching blogs to Blogging Students at Guardian Students. It was partly through that writing that I then came to work here after graduating. Any student can pitch a blog: (http://www.theguardian.com/education/mortarboard/2013/sep/23/blogging-students-how-to-pitch-and-blog). It’s a great way to get your writing out there to a global audience. Having your own blog is also a great way to develop your own writing- the more you write the more you’ll discover what really interests you. Ellie: In your opinion, what do you think is the most important issue affecting young people today?     Libby: There are lots of issues that affect young people. The one that I have done a lot of campaigning on is unpaid internships, so I’d mention that as it’s the subject I know the most about. Long unpaid internships cut off people who can’t afford to work for free and create a society where young people are held back from opportunities not because they’re not talented, but because they can’t afford to work for free.  Ellie:  For hopeful journalists...
Two Minutes With Rich Day – Intern For Micah Challenge International and Advocate for EXPOSED

Two Minutes With Rich Day – Intern For Micah Challenge International and Advocate for EXPOSED

Creative Commons Licensed The EXPOSED campaign seeks to encourage local communities around the world to join in the fight against corruption- a problem that affects everyone, but hits the poorest hardest.  Orchestrated by a coalition of global organisations and churches, they are gathering 1 million signatures to showcase their efforts at the G20 summit at the end of this year, in a bid for practical steps to be taken to promote greater transparency in all aspects of financial affairs; be it within businesses, the government, or individuals . I caught up with Rich Day- an intern for Micah Challenge International- a company supporting the campaign to tell us more on what it’s all about. Ellie: How did you become involved in the EXPOSED campaign and what is your main role? Rich: I am part of a leadership programme, which involves a four-day a week internship for a year. There was a choice of third sector, political or media placement and I chose the third sector. I was particularly interested in working with an organisation tackling injustice and poverty, which is why I am now interning with Micah Challenge International; a global advocacy campaign on extreme poverty. Micah Challenge, along with other organisations and churches, is working on an anti-corruption campaign called EXPOSED, as corruption (in its various forms) is one of the biggest obstacles stopping people escaping extreme poverty – it makes the poor poorer. Ellie: What has been the highlight of your internship so far? Rich: My highlights have been seeing people around the world creatively engaging with the EXPOSED campaign and the issue of corruption, as well as being...
Two minutes with Carlos Carrasco

Two minutes with Carlos Carrasco

 Carlos Carrasco is a researcher at IESE Business School in Spain. He studied Political Science at Pompeu Fabra University (Spain). Previously, he carried out a Public and Social Policy Masters at Pompeu Fabra University and Johns Hopkins University. Additionally, he studied Urban Policy at Johns Hopkins University and Public Finance at the London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE). Due to his knowledge of the Spanish economy, we conducted an interview to establish his views on youth unemployment. We wanted to find out whether he believes that the whopping unemployment rate is due to the Spanish financial crisis, or other social changes. We were also interested in his opinion on contrasts in Spanish and English unemployment rates; England has the second lowest rate of unemployment (Austria has the lowest) in the European Union (EU28) and Spain is one of the countries with the highest unemployment (Greece is on the top of the unemployment list and Spain is the second). 1.  21% of England’s youth are unemployed, compared to 51% in Spain. Why is there such a difference? Firstly, we need to make clear that the 51% unemployment rate does not mean that half of Spanish young people are not working. The percentage indicates that half of young people ‘who want to work’ are not able to. Studying is the most common occupation of people aged between 16 and 24, and students do not contribute to the unemployment rate. Secondly, empirical studies affirm that youth unemployment rate is usually double the general unemployment rate. This happens everywhere in the world. This means that there is not a concrete explanation...
Two Minutes with Judy Fulton, co-founder of Musey- an app for the urban art explorer

Two Minutes with Judy Fulton, co-founder of Musey- an app for the urban art explorer

When I heard Judy Fulton speaking at the ‘Art means business’ conference at Lumiere, Durham 2013, I was inspired by her presentation and the amazing work she is doing. Musey is an app that allows users to track and support all kinds of art taking place around them, empowering artists to create projects outside the confines of a museum or gallery. The app was co-founded by Judy while she was still at university, completing a graduate degree in architecture. The creation of mobile apps is an area of technology that I don’t know much about, but after hearing Judy speak, I realised how useful it could be as a platform for young people’s research. I also loved hearing her talk about all the interesting artists she’d met and the work behind creating the app, so I caught up with her later to find out more about her project. Me:         When did you start developing Musey? Judy:       I started in my final year of architecture school. A friend and I started drawing the idea out. One of the first things we did was speak to Helen Marriage of Artichoke, because we wanted to verify our idea and see if it had any traction or any value. Me:         What did you want to achieve with Musey? Judy:       Well, similar to your 99% idea, 99% of artists will never have a show in a major gallery and will never be represented by a huge art agent or talent scout or anything like that. What will actually happen is that 99% of artists will have to figure out how to make a living.  We...