YOUTH EMPOWERMENT & INNOVATION PROJECT (YEIP) ASSOCIATE

The IARS International Institute is pleased to announce a vacancy for an Associate to work on our Youth Empowerment and Innovation Project (YEIP).  The post is offered under our IARS Associate Scheme, and the application deadline is 18thSeptember 13:00.  Successful candidates will be invited to a face-to-face / online interview during the same week for an immediate start. We have a simple online application process via this link https://www.iars.org.uk/content/IARSassociate The full Job Description and more detailed information about the role can be access via this link. The IARS Associate Scheme In July 2018, we launched a new Membership Plan, which invites our Platinum Members to join our Associates Scheme in order to enable us to develop close relationships with like-minded experts who are able to provide services to IARS on a consultancy basis. Applicants will need to be IARS members or commit to joining IARS at the interview stage. Who we are looking for We are looking for an ambitious Associate with experience in action research methods and with an interest in devising training tools for delivery in schools, universities, youth offending institutions and online. This is a key role that will work directly with the Director on IARS’ Youth Empowerment & Innovation Project, which aims to test new models for tacking youth violent radicalisation and marginalisation. The Role, the application process and our offer The post is offered on a consultancy basis via our Associates’ Scheme. To apply follow this link Our offer includes: 12 month consultancy contract (renewable and extendable depending on funding). £100 per day for 2 days (14 hours) per week. (Travel, subsistence and other expenses will be covered separately and with advance agreement with IARS). CPD...

Young Carers Conference: Barriers to Employment

On Monday 26th March at Dulwich Library, 5pm-7pm, the IARS International Institute is hosting the conference Young Carers: Barriers to Employment.  At the conference, the IARS will present the findings of their year long project ”Young Carers Matter” and engage young carers and professionals to discuss the findings and share their experiences. The ”Young Carers Matter” project was designed to recognise young carers’ unique skill sets and help potential employers understand how valuable these can be, and provided training to both young carers and professionals to support young carers into employment. There are limited spaces available, so click here to register or email e.lanham@iars.org.uk to RSVP. Agenda to follow. We hope to see you...

Call For Papers: 99% Magazine Looking For Young Writers

Are you between the ages of 16-30? Are you passionate about issues facing young people today and interested in getting your voice heard? The 99% Campaign Magazine is looking for writers for its annual issue! We are especially looking for young people who are interested in writing about topics such as; youth unemployment, entrepreneurship and employability, youth radicalisation, the issues facing young carers, equality and anti-discrimination, and the impact of Brexit on young people. The 99% Campaign Magazine is a unique youth-led magazine promoting the positive and creative contributions of young people. By providing a platform where young people are able to express themselves and write about issues that face young people today, the 99% Campaign Magazine aims to make society more inclusive, fair and responsive to young people’s views and realities. If you are interested and would like to contribute, please send a 1000-2500 word article to Internship@iars.org.uk. We also welcome other creative contributions (e.g. interviews, poems or photoshoots).  ...

What Age is too Young to be a Young Carer?

On Monday 11 November 2017, the Evening Standard announced that they are going to start an investigation called The Lost Childhoods. The aim of this new investigation is to bring to light all of the children in London who are vulnerable to “poverty, homelessness, disability, mental health and abuse” (Cohen). In his first article, writer David Cohen interviews Beau Broomfield, an eight year old boy who is serving as his sick mother’s full time carer. Beau describes himself as a very worried child and knows that most kids his age do not have the struggles that he deals with on a daily basis. Ever since he came home to his mum collapsed on the floor, he has taken it upon himself to handle all of her medical needs and house work. He reminds her when to take her pills, helps her move about the house, prepares meals, does laundry, and goes to school. In his mind he knows that he should be out playing with the rest of his 8 year old friends, but his response was “I am worried to leave mum so I stay here” (Broomfield). Unfortunately, Beau’s case is not unique to London’s young people. According to the Children’s Commissioner of England “there are 171,024 young unpaid carers under 18 (in London alone). Some are just under five years old” (Cohen). The reason that the numbers are so high is because many families cannot afford to hire a professional carer, so they rely on their children to take care of them. Beau’s mother, Rose Coffen, for example, has been classified as an ‘in need’ patient, but...
European Solidarity Corps

European Solidarity Corps

Launched under a year ago by the European Union, The European Solidarity Corps is the newest project to get young people out of their comfort zones and out changing the world. With already over 23,000 young people between the ages of 18-30 participating, European Solidarity Corps provides opportunities for Europeans to work or volunteer abroad. Each placement is geared to help both the participant and the people they meet understand the importance of global solidarity. It is all about adapting to other opinions and cultures, while promoting human rights. Young people who want to apply must be open-minded. All of the jobs will require engaging in pluralism, non-discrimination, tolerance, justice, and equality. Additionally, they must be creative because it is encouraged to develop meaningful ways to change society while respecting the culture they are in. Some project examples include: helping to rebuild a school or community centre, supporting newly arrive asylum seekers, clearing vegetation to prevent wildfires, or working with disabled people in a community centre. There are two ways that a young person can get involved with the European Solidarity Corps: volunteering or occupational activities. If one were to opt to volunteer they would have a permanent location for anywhere between 2 and 12 months. This sector is closely related to Erasmus+, so it is common to get funding from the EU to keep up with expenses. Because the work they will be doing is unpaid, volunteers receiving money for travel, accommodation, insurance, meals, and a small amount for living expenses. Those who opt to obtain a job and participate in the occupational activities sector will be paid...

Dynamix Skatepark – An alternative way of challenging ideas

What has a skatepark got to do with promoting Afrikan Sheroes and Heroes? Not much you would imagine… but Dynamix skatepark are doing exactly that, and they’re doing it in the North-East at their base in Gateshead. Dynamix Skatepark is much more than a skate park, with a vision to actively engage and collaborate with their local community (as well as further afield) to offer alternatives to the status quo of traditional thinking, learning, and creating. Throughout this autumn Dynamix will be rolling out a project to challenge people’s thinking  by focusing on Sheroes and Heroes of Afrikan Heritage. Dynamix’s Creative Director, Rosa Stourac McCreery, outlines their aim “to celebrate Sheroes and Heroes of Afrikan Heritage, and to explore the means by which we can actively challenge racism today, and change the narratives about the history of racism, colonialism and power, which takes the form of a number of events, workshops, and new spaces.” From the end of the month onwards Dynamix will be putting on a number of events including a production of The Tempest (28th October), an exhibition with the Ghanaian-British mural artist – Dreph, a workshop with Akala’s Hip-Hop Shakespeare Company, and much more. If you’re in the North-East over the next few months get along and get involved! If you’re interested in the work done by Dynamix have a look at their website, and in particular the wider vision for the organisation as much more than just a skatepark. In our current climate non-traditional service providers are likely to become the active agents for change in our communities, and Dynamix are already taking steps to...