A Letter from Young Entrepreneurs

Are you between the ages of 13-30? Do you have a new business idea? Do you want your business to reach people all over the world? Well, then you should look Eurodesk’s Time2Move Campaign and get your idea up and running in another country, because it is TIME2MOVE! Time2Move is a campaign to help young entrepreneurs work, volunteer, and learn abroad. There are so many opportunities that young people can take advantage of to really boost their confidence in the professional world, and/or get started working in it. The benefit of doing is to become familiar with the host country’s economy and provide a mentor business in that country to learn from. It is a great way to form connections and collaborate abroad. Additionally, by working with Erasmus’s Eurodesk many financial concerns can be taken care of from them. Eurodesk stresses that finding a place to stay, travel expenses, language, etc. should not stop young people from going and breaking out of his or her comfort zone- they are happy to help figure everything out. Going and making connections with people all over the world is the most important thing to do when trying to start a business abroad and Eurodesk does not want anything to get in the way. Through the European Youth Portal, young entrepreneurs have access to the jobs available abroad and information about how to create his or her own company. The European Youth Portal has pledged to fight back against youth unemployment because there are so many opportunities abroad that many people do not know about. Whether it is an apprenticeship, traineeship, mentorship, or...
Really We Care!

Really We Care!

Getting ready for work this morning I was watching BBC Breakfast; mainly to see what weather Carol had in store for us here at Canada Water, and my interest was peaked by an article about the high suicide rates within care professionals.  The pressures and expectations that go along with this line of work are pushing people, who start with the best of motives, to the brink of despair. Yet against the background of this story, our society increasingly expects children and young people, who are by reasons of chance, living with a dependent relative to provide that long-term care for their dependent parent.  As a parent it never occurred to me that one of my children would be my care giver, at least not whilst they are young, it seems somehow the wrong way around – but we are lucky and eternally grateful for that luck. To complicate the lives of young carers further, their time is spent with their families whilst other young people spend time building their interests and loading their CVs.  Often young carers skills are not explained to potential employers and not referenced on the carers’ CVs.  Perhaps it’s “just what we do” or perhaps they are unseen skills, either way these life experiences, often more adult in their nature than their peers experience, are not used to fulfill the potential of these young peoples lives. IARS has been working with partners across Europe to find ways to support young carers and the professionals who work with them to make the most of their skills and experiences and use their unique skill sets to gain employment.  Our...
Make Our Rights Reality!

Make Our Rights Reality!

Author Notes: Joe Lee-Dowd is the Volunteer Campaign Assistant at Youth Access, a membership organisation for young people’s services based in South London. If you are a young person, chances are you will have experienced the inevitable: you will have felt marginalised. A blend of the establishment’s neglect of young people’s voices, the negative stereotypes so often unfairly applied to young people, and the lack of essential support for often vulnerable groups can leave us feeling ostracised and hard done by. My own experience has been one of the more common for young people moving into adulthood: countless job applications, very few responses, even fewer interviews and zero offers. But this issue is relatively insignificant compared with those faced by over a million young people every year. They might not have a supporting family to live with and keep food on the table; they might be in debilitating debt; they might have crippling mental health issues; they might be facing complicated legal proceedings; they might not have a bed to sleep in let alone a job to go to. We have basic rights to housing, education, a reasonable standard of living, good health care and protection from abuse and exploitation. Perhaps even more importantly we have the right to the knowledge and means to enforce these rights, through information, advice and support – we have the right to be heard! And Youth Access’ research shows that millions of young people are not being heard. This is unacceptable and it’s time for the rights of young people to be taken seriously. This is why I have recently volunteered for Youth...

99% Campaign Experience

Author: Coretta Kamdem (Digital Campiagns Intern at IARS and 99% Campaign Editorial Board member) Over the past three months, I have been working for the 99% campaign as a Digital Campaigns Intern and a member of the Youth Editorial Board.  My time at the 99% campaign has been a truly positive experience; I was given the chance to make a positive difference in the lives of young people. I helped produce and deliver a workshop at the No Hate Conference, highlighting the ways young people can use digital tools to combat cyber bullying. I had the opportunity to meet other politically and socially active young people through the 99% Campaign’s Youth Editorial Board.  The Youth Editorial Board has exposed me to the different issues that plague young people and the different solutions that we as young people have for problems important to us. The 99% Campaign is a movement that allows young people to combat the negative stereotypes communicated in the media and empowers young people to promote issues important to their daily life.  Participating in the 99% Campaign opened my eyes to the lack of voice young people have in the world of civic-decision making. However, it also allowed me to become a part of a movement that promotes and nurtures the exchange of ideas. The campaign encourages young people to think and act on their ideas of how to change their community. The 99% Campaign has given myself and other young people an outlet to develop and communicate our ideas to the world. It has been a truly wonderful experience so far and I cannot wait to...
The Class Gap

The Class Gap

Author: “Shakiesha Beckford, LSE student and Editorial Board Creative Associate.” I have now finished my second year of university and it has dawned on me that I have no work experience. I have always dreamt of becoming what one may refer to as a ‘modern day explorer’. I thoroughly enjoy interacting with people of different ethno-religious groups. I enjoy learning new things and understanding how different people live in different parts of the world. I wanted to become an explorer because I believe many people in the west, as well as in various other sections of the world, live in a ‘bubble’. What I mean by a ‘bubble’ is that we do not know or care to understand how other people live; many of us tend to listen to folk-devil stories and take them as the truth. The truth is to be discovered! My aim has always been to bring the truth to everyone’s table, allowing them to indulge in it. I understand that not everyone wants to know the truth, simply because the truth can be hard to digest. However, I aim to offer a solution. Everything in this world is subject to change. I have always wanted to help people by making a positive change to the world; by giving a voice to those often rendered invisible. I have decided that in order to achieve my life long dream, I need to be given a chance. I need someone to see my potential, to guide me, to teach me, thus enabling me to reach my potential. I need work experience! All I seek is a chance and all...