Celebrating Volunteers’ Week 1-7 June 2015

Celebrating Volunteers’ Week 1-7 June 2015

This week 1st -7th June volunteering is being celebrated across the country.  Volunteers’ Week aims recognise the invaluable contributions of millions of volunteers across the UK and raise awareness of the value and impact of volunteering on our lives and the society. As a genuine youth-led, user led International Institute our volunteers are at the heart of our work and we would like to take this opportunity to say a BIG THANK YOU to all our volunteers who have made outstanding contributions to our work and support us on a daily basis to create a fairer and more inclusive society where everyone has a chance to be heard. To celebrate volunteers’ week we share the thoughts and the experiences of our intern Gabe Sanders the last three months at IARS. “When monetary compensation is taken out of the equation in the decision to work at an NGO or community organization, a volunteer’s contribution and return on the time and effort put into his or her work appreciate in value greatly. Focus turns to questions like, “What can I contribute today?” and “What can I learn from this experience?” Volunteering at an NGO like the IARS International Institute evoked just such questions, and answered them in a new way every day during my time working there. That being said, my interview before beginning work at Independent Academic Research Studies did not go as I thought it would; it went far better. After nearly an hour and a half of discussing the NGO’s needs and what I could offer, the Communications Manager  and I arrived at a sort of harmonious understanding that could not...
Social correction versus bullying

Social correction versus bullying

Author note: Sarah O’Brien is studying for a BA in Journalism & new media at the University of Limerick in Ireland. She enjoys reading Marian Keys and fantasy fiction and has a keen interest in blogging, keeping both a make-up blog and a more ‘serious’ blog on Word press. The term “social correction” implies bringing an individual back into line with what is considered socially appropriate in the given culture/continent/creed/context in which they choose to reside. Social correction as an idea makes sense, particularly when correcting ideologies about racism, sexism, homophobia, and so on. It can serve a purpose in those contexts, because it is actively seeking to quell an insidious wave of human behaviour that is damaging to us all. Etymologically speaking, the term “correction” has an array of meanings which are applicable in a number of contexts. One such explanation sees correction as punishment intended to rehabilitate or improve. Paired with terminology like social, correction becomes the ultimate display of panopticism – citizens policing other citizen’s behaviour, judging them by whatever standard they see fit, as long as it remains in keeping with the majority. In a wider context, social policing in this manner, is actually very necessary. Modern society moves like a well-oiled machine, steam rolling over any who refuse to cooperate. More often than not that cooperation protects us. It maintains a status quo that allows people to sleep safer in their beds at night, safe in the knowledge that where they live, murder, theft and so on are not considered socially acceptable and therefore should anything happen, their perpetrators will be held accountable-punished if you will....
2015: The Case of the Forgotten Youth?

2015: The Case of the Forgotten Youth?

Author’s note: This blog post was written by Editorial Team Creative Associate, Jack Welch. Jack is a graduate in English and Creative Writing from the University of Winchester Just as 2015 beckons a new dawn for a brighter start in the UK, with unemployment contracts and its trading partners across the continent lags no better than stagnation, it may well be implied that this may be one of the few general elections of modern times when the country is not sitting in the midst of a political scandal, a recession or some form of crisis we have a habit of getting ourselves into. Within that spectrum of dangerous habits, complacency is set to play its hand in the question few in society dare to face, but where the decision makers have set in motion already: is there a really a future for youth post-2015? This year’s round of local authority grants cull have seen an average of 1.8% reduction, smaller in comparison to recent years, but in the period between 2010-16, a most councils will see a more perilous 25% reduction in their income and an increase of outsourcing of services to more private sector bodies (if achievable). While this consistent hatchet within the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) may embrace the current austerity culture, and indeed have 50 tips to guide reluctant councils to adopt the same mood, the impact upon children’s services and outreach provision for young people looks to be the obvious choice. Within my own county of Dorset for example, which is forced to find £1.7 million from their average spending, there is...