Community-led Project To Boost Employability Of Bame Young Carers In Southwark

Community-led Project To Boost Employability Of Bame Young Carers In Southwark

An innovative community-led project that will boost the employability of hundreds of young Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young carers in the borough of Southwark is announced today. The project titled “Young Carers Matter” is funded under the Communities Fund of the Department of Communities and Local Government and will be delivered by the IARS International Institute, a Southwark-based charity in partnership with Southwark Council. Dr. Theo Gavrielides, Founder and Director of the IARS International Institute said: “Young Carers is undoubtedly one of the most marginalised groups in our prosperous society. Our youth-led project will provide young carers living in Southwark with accredited training that builds on their strengths and skills, while empowering them to achieve independent and fulfilling lives. Building on strategic alliances of a local network and by allowing our young people to lead, I am confident that “Young Carers Matter” will pave the way national and internationally”. Guided by an Independent Youth Advisory Board consisting of 10 young carers, and through the development of a dynamic local stakeholders’ network, “Young Carers Matter” will bring together local service providers, employment services, employers, key stakeholders from Southwark Council and young carers to develop effective strategies and policies and improve educational and employability outcomes for young carers. Currently, over 2,500 young people who provide care to friends and family live in Southwark and many more that are likely to be invisible to service providers. Due to their caring responsibilities, young carers may compromise their educational and employment opportunities. Service providers involved in the “Young Carers Matter” Network will also be benefited by the project as they will be offered...
Press Release: IARS 4th Research and Youth Leadership Awards Winners 2015 Announced

Press Release: IARS 4th Research and Youth Leadership Awards Winners 2015 Announced

14 Young Role Models and youth projects were recognised for their roles in our communities Around 100 young people, representatives of youth organisations attended this year’s IARS Research and Youth Leadership Awards 2015, in partnership with the 99% Campaign that took place last night at the Canada Water Culture Space in London. The Awards, now on its 4th year recognise and champion young people and their initiatives in their communities as drivers for social change. This unique youth-led event, organised by a group of young people involved in the IARS Youth Advisory Board, hosted influential keynote speakers in the field of youth policy and practice, including Howard Williamson CBE FRSA FHEA, Professor of European Youth Policy, University of South Wales, Justin Pettit, Human Rights Officer at the Commonwealth Secretariat, Mak Chisty, Commander for Engagement in the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and Mark Parker, I LIVE IN SE16 Coordinator. 14 inspirational young people and projects from up and down the UK were awarded in 7 categories, designed carefully to cover a broad area of truly youth-led projects, skills and competences, supported by leading businesses  and organisations across the UK. The Winners for 2015 are : Youth Research Project Award – Sponsored by Buckinghamshire New University Winner: Eloise Peabody Rolf – The ‘Volunteer’s Perspective’ of the Hampshire Community Peer Court programme Runner Up: Karolina Kombert: Young people, homelessness, UK welfare reform and food poverty in Scotland, published in the Youth Voice Journal. Community Leader Award – Sponsored by  Community Action Southwark Winners: Kike Ibikunle and Ijeoma Datha-Moore for their contributions to the Just for Kids Law team as volunteers and ambassadors. Runner Up: Jack Samuel David Wilson for his exemplar campaigning...
99% Campaign Statement: Youth Unemployment – Failing Today’s Youth (Update)

99% Campaign Statement: Youth Unemployment – Failing Today’s Youth (Update)

Youth unemployment continues to be a real problem for the young people of Britain. Whilst unemployment figures, in general, are falling – down to 2.02m in the latest statistics released – young people continue to make up a significant proportion of people without work. 16.9% of young people are currently out of work, in comparison the nationwide average of 6.4%. Without being rectified, this situation will lead to the creation of a vast swathe of people left without prospects and without any path to follow. Creating this kind of hole for young people to fall into, or at least failing to show them a way out, will only lead to further, less manageable problems. The 99% Campaign have written a policy statement which we think offers a route towards solving the issue of youth unemployment, not just in the short-term but for the foreseeable future. Too often when it comes to trying to resolve a problem we look for an immediate fix rather than looking further down the line and showing some patience in our response. In our opinion, what is needed is an approach which looks at the immediate issue and tries to help those in need, but also looks at what will continue to happen if certain things are not changed within the system, and the problems that will continue to occur. Our statement offers three recommendations which are listed below. These recommendations came about through discussions with 99% Campaign volunteers, forums with secondary school students in London, and surveys with a variety of young people – ranging from school students to university graduates. The information we...
99% Campaign Policy Statement – Youth Employment: Failing Today’s Youth

99% Campaign Policy Statement – Youth Employment: Failing Today’s Youth

2.16m people are currently unemployed in the UK, and nearly 40%, or 853,000 of these are aged 16-24. The 99% Campaign has decided to target youth unemployment as its newest campaign. The team decided that this was an issue which demanded commitment to a long-term solution, not just because of its stubbornness over the past years, but as an issue which affects the majority of young Brits. We know that high levels of unemployment can be the start of other social problems. Political apathy, homelessness and spouts of depression are some of the symptoms which emerge when equality of opportunity is denied. On top of this, with the General Elections next year, fresh ideas and new policies are in high demand by each political party as they vie for public approval. We aim to take advantage of this situation and have set ourselves a mission: to gather the voices of young people and communicate their experiences to policymakers. The final product is the 99% Campaign policy statement, found below. We have already discussed the statement with a number of politicians including, Baroness Estelle Morris (former Minister for Education) and Sarah Champion MP, and have several meetings in the coming weeks and months to look forward to. The interest has been high and we hope that we can continue to develop the document to create a solid piece of research to influence...
So you’ve graduated. Now what?

So you’ve graduated. Now what?

            By Richard Goughie Unless you have clear set goals and know exactly what you want to do with your life, leaving college or university can be a tough time. For the first time in years, you’re thrown out of the school structure and into the big bad world; it’s exciting, but it’s worrying. I have only just finished university, so I don’t have the best authority to give advice, but I will give it my best shot. I left university a month ago and recently realised that I have become increasingly unmotivated. I’m far less excited than I was right after school, when I started to chuck all of my notepads in the bin, ready to begin ‘life’. I know others will be facing the same struggle, so I thought I would write a little piece of how to manage after graduation. When you’re given the chance to plan your life and choose what you want to do, and where you want to be, the last thing you want is unnecessary, confusing advice from people around you. Selective hearing comes in handy when somebody who’s ‘been there done that’ is trying to give you advice. Subsequently you may start to question yourself; it can leave you feeling lost instead of give you direction. Often people think they know best for you, but they don’t realize they’re talking to their younger self– not the individual in front of them. ‘Individual’ is the key word here. With all the social media at our fingertips, I feel people are losing sight of individuality. When you’re looking...
Should Graduates Step Back from the Debate on Youth Unemployment?

Should Graduates Step Back from the Debate on Youth Unemployment?

Last month, I attended the 99% Campaign’s parliamentary event on youth unemployment in Westminster. The event was extremely well-attended, and the debate could have gone on for many hours longer than it did. At times though, it felt as if there were two separate discussions going on about two different types of youth unemployment. Many of the panelists wanted to discuss unemployment among school leavers and the weakness of various measures designed to help them–from careers advice in schools to apprenticeships. However, many of young people present were recent graduates for whom “youth unemployment” meant them and their friends being unable to find work after graduation. Before the event, I instinctively found myself in the latter camp. I will graduate from a Master’s Degree in September, and not a day goes by when I don’t worry about what comes next. For me and many other recent graduates, there is a feeling that life has changed the rules of the game right at the moment of our greatest triumph. As the meeting went on though, my attitude began to shift. Some of the older panelists began to discuss their own experiences of unemployment after graduating from university. The idea that a few months of post-graduate economic inactivity would be devastating to an individual’s long term ambitions and prospects was difficult to reconcile with the fact that these stories were coming from the director of a major think tank and an MP. When you enquire a little further, you realise that countless successful people have had a stage of their life in their early twenties where they struggled to find a place...