Drop-In Project Update

Drop-In is an e-training and networking platform that helps train young people that do not have proper degrees. Each course is tailored to the exact needs of the young person who is taking it. Additionally, it will supply these young people with the contacts of companies that are hiring. It is easy to manage and can be done on the young person’s own time. Plus, since it is offered in many countries, it is easy for young people to travel the world as well as take their online courses. For the week of November 12-16 2018, the third partner meeting for the Drop-In Project was held in Bucharest, Romania. The training project was attended by members of all five project partners including KMOP (Greece), InEuropa (Italy), CARDET (Cyprus), The Schottener Foundation (Romania) and IARS (UK). Project partners came together to discuss the situations and challenges faced by early school leavers (ESLs) and current practices being implemented to combat ESL marginalisation in each of the respective countries. With the introduction of programmes such as the Drop-In project, young people can feel empowered to take control of their future by gaining skills they may not have learned on their own or in previous education. The Drop-In Project is now in its’ second year of implementation and the launch of the e-Learning platform is nearly ready to be completed. Starting in December 2018, the platform will be accessible to ESL individuals in each of the five countries. These individuals will complete a set of nine modules related to personal development, critical thinking, problem solving, career planning, and much more. Once all nine...

A REFLECTION OF MY FIRST WORK TRIP ABROAD

Warm greetings to my fellow young people, as well as other readers! I would like to share with you my experience as I went abroad for my first work trip at the The IARS International Institute. Recently, I had the tremendous fortune of travelling to and attend the Promyse staff training event in Vilnius, Lithuania. This took place as part of a short-term staff training event put on through IARS International institute among other representative, including Diesis COOP based in Belgium, Diversity Development Group in Vilnius, ICSE & Co in Italy and finally, KMOP in London. All teams came together to discuss Promyse – a project that was founded by the European commission, with the objective to promote social entrepreneurship in the health and social care sector. The whole journey was an unreal experience and greatly expanded my own perspective on the world, youth engagement and of the increasing importance of social enterprise. My fellow colleague, Natalia and I met at Liverpool Street Station to get the train to Stansted Airport. Upon arriving at the hotel at 1am, we retired for the night and prepared ourselves for the busy week ahead. On our first day, we all ushered into the meeting room where we would experience our first encounter with the rest of the team and prepared for the introduction and team building, along with the social networking. Towards the evening, we had a relaxed walk around the beautiful city of Vilnius. There is a variety of Soviet architecture in the city and remarkable buildings like the Seimas Palace which is a symbol of resistance of the Lithuanian nation...

Young Carers Conference: Barriers to Employment

On Monday 26th March at Dulwich Library, 5pm-7pm, the IARS International Institute is hosting the conference Young Carers: Barriers to Employment.  At the conference, the IARS will present the findings of their year long project ”Young Carers Matter” and engage young carers and professionals to discuss the findings and share their experiences. The ”Young Carers Matter” project was designed to recognise young carers’ unique skill sets and help potential employers understand how valuable these can be, and provided training to both young carers and professionals to support young carers into employment. There are limited spaces available, so click here to register or email e.lanham@iars.org.uk to RSVP. Agenda to follow. We hope to see you...

A Letter from Young Entrepreneurs

Are you between the ages of 13-30? Do you have a new business idea? Do you want your business to reach people all over the world? Well, then you should look Eurodesk’s Time2Move Campaign and get your idea up and running in another country, because it is TIME2MOVE! Time2Move is a campaign to help young entrepreneurs work, volunteer, and learn abroad. There are so many opportunities that young people can take advantage of to really boost their confidence in the professional world, and/or get started working in it. The benefit of doing is to become familiar with the host country’s economy and provide a mentor business in that country to learn from. It is a great way to form connections and collaborate abroad. Additionally, by working with Erasmus’s Eurodesk many financial concerns can be taken care of from them. Eurodesk stresses that finding a place to stay, travel expenses, language, etc. should not stop young people from going and breaking out of his or her comfort zone- they are happy to help figure everything out. Going and making connections with people all over the world is the most important thing to do when trying to start a business abroad and Eurodesk does not want anything to get in the way. Through the European Youth Portal, young entrepreneurs have access to the jobs available abroad and information about how to create his or her own company. The European Youth Portal has pledged to fight back against youth unemployment because there are so many opportunities abroad that many people do not know about. Whether it is an apprenticeship, traineeship, mentorship, or...

Extreme Need of the Good Life Model for Young People to Avoid Extremists

It is apparent that young people are the target of extremist groups, because they are the most vulnerable and easy to radicalise. During a person’s adolescent and teenage years they are very impressionable to the world around them. The most important thing for most of these adolescents is to find a place to fit in. It is the period of time where they want to be independent but they still have to rely on their parents and the thoughts of their peers; they do not know which way to go. All they want is to think freely, but social and economic pressures make it difficult for them to discover who they are and what they want. Their minds are so malleable that they make the perfect prey for terror groups to spread their ideology. By creating an exclusive subculture, extremists make their targets feel like they are important; their opinions are finally heard and deemed valuable. How can we avoid this? How can we save our youth before they are in trouble? There will never be one definite answer, however, emphasis on the Good Life Model (GLM) in schools and everyday life has great potential to strengthen the minds of the vulnerable and halt radicalisation. The GLM focuses on creating a balanced and well dignified life for not only young people, but all people. However, it is essential that a young person is raised in the values that it upholds so he or she can be confident in their trade and pass on their knowledge. It is human nature to want to succeed in life. There is nothing quite...
A Lesson Learnt from Brexit

A Lesson Learnt from Brexit

I was one of the 75% of 18-24 year olds who voted to remain in the European Union. That means I’m one of the 36% of 18-24 year olds who turned up to cast their ballot on 23rd June last year. These two statistics don’t sit comfortably together for me. The UK voted to leave by a narrow margin, 51.9% to 48.1%; had young people gone to the polls and made their voice heard might there have been a different outcome? We are now facing the greatest political upheaval of recent history. The UK is entering into a complex and lengthy negotiation process; there is simultaneously so much at stake and so little certainty. Whatever the outcome it is young people that will feel the consequences the longest. It is estimated that young people will have to live with the decision of the referendum for an average of 69 years. This makes the referendum the arguably the most significant political event of my generations lifetime, but one where the majority of young people did not vote. While a staggering 90% of those over the age of 65 voted in the EU referendum, a group that were overwhelmingly leave. A vote represents a chance to secure or change the future of how your country is governed. The upcoming election will determine the direction of UK policy, including how Brexit is implemented. However young people are massively under represented on the electoral register and youth turnout at elections is the lowest in Europe (among the 15 old EU members). With young people are not turning up to vote is it any...